Ask me anything
Archive
Amy.
23 years old.
Australia.



Anonymous asked: mbti?

INFP

Anonymous asked: I saw you get off the craigeburn train at Melbourne central today. I so wanted to say hi but was running late for work :( would it have been weird if I did?

I don’t catch the craigeburn train but was at Melbourne Central that day, it wouldn’t of been weird but I would probably feel awkward

Anonymous asked: Is your profile pic a zombie costume pic or something?

Uh no, it’s Faith from Buffy the Vampire Slayer/Angel

capaldi-kidney asked: Have you just recently changed your name on tumblr I have not noticed you before and you seem to stick out well as far as my interests go

No I haven’t, just haven’t been on it for months till now :)

Anonymous asked: I love your body... I want to cuddle you so tight... ♡♥

;)

"

I felt a Funeral, in my Brain,
And Mourners to and fro
Kept treading–treading–till it seemed
That Sense was breaking through–

And when they all were seated,
A Service, like a Drum–
Kept beating–beating–till I thought
My Mind was going numb–

And then I heard them lift a Box
And creak across my Soul
With those same Boots of Lead, again,
Then Space–began to toll,

As all the Heavens were a Bell,
And Being, but an Ear,
And I, and Silence, some strange Race
Wrecked, solitary, here–

And then a Plank in Reason, broke,
And I dropped down, and down–
And hit a World, at every plunge,
And Finished knowing–then–

"
— Emily Dickinson
ginger-and-fred:

Modern Vintage: Sofia Coppola’s nod to the unarguably sexy Norma Shearer
Top: Norma Shearer in a too-sexy promotional photo for The Divorcee (1930) Bottom: Kirsten Dunst in Sofia Coppola’s 

ginger-and-fred:

Modern Vintage: Sofia Coppola’s nod to the unarguably sexy Norma Shearer

Top: Norma Shearer in a too-sexy promotional photo for The Divorcee (1930) Bottom: Kirsten Dunst in Sofia Coppola’s 

Anonymous asked: Do you have an 8tracks?

nostalgicdreams

"

The next day I started with the medications and the therapy. And I also started reckoning with this terrible question: If I’m not the tough person who could have made it through a concentration camp, then who am I? And if I have to take medication, is that medication making me more fully myself, or is it making me someone else? And how do I feel about it if it’s making me someone else?

I had two advantages as I went in to the fight. The first is that I knew that, objectively speaking, I had a nice life, and that if I could only get well, there was something at the other end that was worth living for. And the other was that I had access to good treatment.

But I nonetheless emerged and relapsed, and emerged and relapsed, and emerged and relapsed, and finally understood I would have to be on medication and in therapy forever. And I thought, “But is it a chemical problem or a psychological problem? And does it need a chemical cure or a philosophical cure?” And I couldn’t figure out which it was. And then I understood that actually, we aren’t advanced enough in either area for it to explain things fully. The chemical cure and the psychological cure both have a role to play, and I also figured out that depression was something that was braided so deep into us that there was no separating it from our character and personality.

"
— Andrew Solomon

eyduh:

Sometimes it’s hard to find the words to say

I’ll go ahead and say them anyway [x]

gingerhaze:

I was talking to my brother about women’s attitudes towards their bodies, especially regarding weight/fat, and when he said “most guys don’t notice/care about that kind of thing,” I tried to explain why it was a lot more complicated than that. I ended up telling this story.

Body image is something that’s so hard to talk about, and it’s hard to express body positivity without sounding cheesy, false, or overly simplistic. But I’m gonna try. This is only my own experience, and it didn’t magically cure me of all my body image issues - but it was a major turning point for me nonetheless.image

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